Lolita por Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita por Vladimir Nabokov

Titulo del libro: Lolita

Autor: Vladimir Nabokov

ISBN: 8433928473

Vladimir Nabokov con Lolita

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Los adjetivos de escandalosa, inmoral, decadente y ultrajante acompanaron largo tiempo a Lolita, hoy ya considerada una obra maestra de la literatura. La historia de la obsesion de Humbert Humbert, un profesor cuarenton, por la doceanera Lolita es una extraordinaria novela de amor en la que intervienen dos componentes explosivos: la atraccion perversa por las ninfulas y el incesto. Un itinerario a traves de la locura y la muerte, que desemboca en una estilizadisima violencia, narrado, a la vez con autoironia y lirismo desenfrenado, por el propio Humbert Humbert. Lolita es tambien un retrato acido y visionario de los Estados Unidos, de los horrores suburbanos y de la cultura del plastico y del motel. Una de las novelas mas cultas (y tambien mas divertidas) de nuestra epoca, una exhibicion deslumbrante de talento y humor.

Amazon Review
Despite its lascivious reputation, the pleasures of Lolita are as much intellectual as erogenous. It is a love story with the power to raise both chuckles and eyebrows. Humbert Humbert is a European intellectual adrift in America, haunted by memories of a lost adolescent love. When he meets his ideal nymphet in the shape of 12-year-old Dolores Haze, he constructs an elaborate plot to seduce her, but first he must get rid of her mother. In spite of his diabolical wit, reality proves to be more slippery than Humbert's feverish fantasies and Lolita refuses to conform to his image of the perfect lover. Playfully perverse in form as well as content, riddled with puns and literary allusions, Nabokov's 1955 novel is a hymn to the Russian-born author's delight in his adopted language. Indeed, readers who want to probe all of its allusive nooks and crannies will need to consult the annotated edition. Lolita is undoubtedly, brazenly erotic, but the eroticism springs less from the "frail honey-hued shoulders ... the silky supple bare back" of little Lo than it does from the wantonly gorgeous prose that Humbert uses to recount his forbidden passion: "She was musical and apple-sweet ... Lola the bobby-soxer, devouring her immemorial fruit, singing through its juice ... and every movement she made, every shuffle and ripple, helped me to conceal and to improve the secret system of tactile correspondence between beast and beauty--between my gagged, bursting beast and the beauty of her dimpled body in its innocent cotton frock. " Much has been made of Lolita as metaphor, perhaps because the love affair at its heart is so troubling. Humbert represents the formal, educated Old World of Europe, while Lolita is America: ripening, beautiful, but not too bright and a little vulgar. Nabokov delights in exploring the intercourse between these cultures and the passages where Humbert describes the suburbs and strip malls and motels of post-war America are filled with both attraction and repulsion: "Those restaurants where the holy spirit of Huncan Dines had descended upon the cute paper napkins and cottage-cheese-crested salads." Yet however tempting the novel's symbolism may be, its chief delight--and power--lies in the character of Humbert Humbert. He, at least as he tells it, is no seedy skulker, no twisted destroyer of innocence. Instead, Nabokov's celebrated mouthpiece is erudite and witty, even at his most depraved. Humbert can't help it--linguistic jouissance is as important to him as the satisfaction of his arrested libido. --Simon Leake

Review
"The only convincing love story of our century." —"Vanity Fair"
""Lolita" blazes with a perversity of a most original kind. For Mr. Nabokov has distilled from his shocking material hundred-proof intellectual farce…"Lolita" seems an assertion of the power of the comic spirit to wrest delight and truth from the most outlandish materials. It is one of the funniest serious novels I have ever read; and the vision of its abominable hero, who never deludes or excuses himself, brings into grotesque relief the cant, the vulgarity, and the hypocritical conventions that pervade the human comedy." —"Atlantic Monthly"
"Intensely lyrical and wildly funny." —"Time"
"The conjunction of a sense of humor with a sense of horror [results in] satire of a very special kind, in which vice or folly is regarded not so much with scorn as with profound dismay and a measure of tragic sympathy…The reciprocal flow of irony gives to both th

"The only convincing love story of our century." "Vanity Fair"
""Lolita" blazes with a perversity of a most original kind. For Mr. Nabokov has distilled from his shocking material hundred-proof intellectual farce "Lolita" seems an assertion of the power of the comic spirit to wrest delight and truth from the most outlandish materials. It is one of the funniest serious novels I have ever read; and the vision of its abominable hero, who never deludes or excuses himself, brings into grotesque relief the cant, the vulgarity, and the hypocritical conventions that pervade the human comedy." "Atlantic Monthly"
"Intensely lyrical and wildly funny." "Time"
"The conjunction of a sense of humor with a sense of horror [results in] satire of a very special kind, in which vice or folly is regarded not so much with scorn as with profound dismay and a measure of tragic sympathy The reciprocal flow of irony gives to both the characters and their surroundings the peculiar intensity of significance that attends the highest art." "The New Yorker"
""Lolita" is an authentic work of art which compels our immediate response and serious reflection a revealing and indispensable comedy of horrors." "San Francisco Chronicle""

"The only convincing love story of our century." Vanity Fair
"Lolita blazes with a perversity of a most original kind. For Mr. Nabokov has distilled from his shocking material hundred-proof intellectual farce Lolita seems an assertion of the power of the comic spirit to wrest delight and truth from the most outlandish materials. It is one of the funniest serious novels I have ever read; and the vision of its abominable hero, who never deludes or excuses himself, brings into grotesque relief the cant, the vulgarity, and the hypocritical conventions that pervade the human comedy." Atlantic Monthly
"Intensely lyrical and wildly funny." Time
"The conjunction of a sense of humor with a sense of horror [results in] satire of a very special kind, in which vice or folly is regarded not so much with scorn as with profound dismay and a measure of tragic sympathy The reciprocal flow of irony gives to both the characters and their surroundings the peculiar intensity of significance that attends the highest art." The New Yorker
"Lolita is an authentic work of art which compels our immediate response and serious reflection a revealing and indispensable comedy of horrors." San Francisco Chronicle"

"The only convincing love story of our century." --Vanity Fair

"Lolita blazes with a perversity of a most original kind. For Mr. Nabokov has distilled from his shocking material hundred-proof intellectual farce...Lolita seems an assertion of the power of the comic spirit to wrest delight and truth from the most outlandish materials. It is one of the funniest serious novels I have ever read; and the vision of its abominable hero, who never deludes or excuses himself, brings into grotesque relief the cant, the vulgarity, and the hypocritical conventions that pervade the human comedy." --Atlantic Monthly

"Intensely lyrical and wildly funny." --Time

"The conjunction of a sense of humor with a sense of horror [results in] satire of a very special kind, in which vice or folly is regarded not so much with scorn as with profound dismay and a measure of tragic sympathy...The reciprocal flow of irony gives to both the characters and their surroundings the peculiar intensity of significance that attends the highest art." --The New Yorker

"Lolita is an authentic work of art which compels our immediate response and serious reflection-a revealing and indispensable comedy of horrors." --San Francisco Chronicle

From the Inside Flap
With an Introduction by Martin Amis
When it was published in 1955, Lolita immediately became a cause celebre because of the freedom and sophistication with which it handled the unusual erotic predilections of its protagonist. But Vladimir Nabokov's wise, ironic, elegant masterpiece owes its stature as one of the twentieth century's novels of record not to the controversy its material aroused but to its author's use of that material to tell a love story almost shocking in its beauty and tenderness.
Awe and exhilaration--along with heartbreak and mordant wit--abound in this account of the aging Humbert Humbert's obsessive, devouring, and doomed passion for the nymphet Dolores Haze. Lolita is also the story of a hypercivilized European colliding with the cheerful barbarism of postwar America, but most of all, it is a meditation on love--love as outrage and hallucination, madness and transformation.